Providing gospel-centered resources to mobilize the church for global orphan care.

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NatCon 2014 Graphic
*The church in the image above is our 2014 conference host.

We now have our final main session speaker in place to help us address this year’s conference theme (“Urgency & Complexity: Biblical & Ethical Approaches to the Orphan Crisis”). Dr. Elizabeth Bartholet, a Professor of Law at Harvard, is joining us to speak on “Family First: International Adoption as a Human Rights Issue.” We are thrilled she will be with us this year as we consider the vitally important issues surrounding biblical and ethical approaches to the global orphan crisis.

Dr. Bartholet “is the Morris Wasserstein Public Interest Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Child Advocacy Program (CAP), which she founded in the fall of 2004. She teaches civil rights and family law, specializing in child welfare, adoption, and reproductive technology.”

Elizabeth Bartholet Photo

Below is most of what you’ll get with our main sessions at this year’s T4A conference:

Main Session 1: “The Gospel of Adoption as Family Reunification” (Dan Cruver, 28 minutes); Continuing the Conversation (20 minutes): Jason Kovacs, Jedd Medefind, & Dan Cruver

Main Session 2: “The Church’s Role in Family Preservation, Reunification, and Adoption” (Jedd Medefind, 28 minutes); Continuing the Conversation (20 minutes): Jason Kovacs, Elizabeth Styffe, & Jedd Medefind

Main Session 3: Multiple 10 minute talks with speakers including the following: Chris Marlow, Phil Darke, Elizabeth Styffe, Daniel Bennett, Mike Rusch, Rick Morton, Dr. Susan Hillis, and others.

Main Session 4: “Child Catchers or The Hands and Feet of Jesus? How Everyday Christians Can Engage in the Complex World of Orphan Care & Adoption” (Brandon Hatmaker, 28 minutes); Continuing the Conversation (20 minutes): TBA

Main Session 5: “Family First: International Adoption as a Human Rights Issue” (Dr. Elizabeth Bartholet, 28 minutes); Continuing the Conversation (20 minutes): TBA

Main Session 6: “Balancing the Scales: Protecting and Defending the Fatherless in Our Own Communities” (John Sowers, 28 minutes); Continuing the Conversation (20 minutes): TBA

Main Session 7: “Where Do We Go from Here? The Future of the Church and the Global Orphan Crisis” (Jason Kovacs, 28 minutes); Continuing the Conversation (20 minutes): Jedd Medefind, Dan Cruver, & Jason Kovacs

In addition to our main sessions, we will have 4 breakout session slots with 10-12 breakouts/workshops each.

Stay tuned for information about registration and other important conference details. Oh, and don’t forget that our host church is providing free childcare for our attendees! 

The Love Story of the Incarnation

by Dan Cruver Published Feb 24, 2014

Below is a sermon I had the privilege of preaching this last Sunday at Shannon Forest Presbyterian Church of Greenville, South Carolina.

Know More Orphans

by Dan Cruver Published Feb 20, 2014

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Join Tony Merida, Russ Moore, Rick Morton, Bryan Loritts, and many others for Altar 84′s Know More Orphans Conference.

Learn more about this excellent conference!

Know More Orphans from Altar84 on Vimeo.

NatCon 2014 Graphic
*The church in the image above is our 2014 conference host.

We are excited to announce that our host church (Simpsonville First Baptist) for this year’s conference is providing free childcare! Yes, that’s right, not only are we able to provide childcare this year, but it’s also free of charge. We are very grateful to Simpsonville First Baptist for serving families in this way.

Also, in order to accommodate the schedule of a couple of this year’s speakers, we changed our conference dates from October 10-11 to October 17-18. Please make note of that change.

Our primary objective for this year’s gathering is to maximize our time together by providing important conversations with people who are key leaders, thinkers, and practitioners in the global orphan movement. We want to facilitate extended conversations that matter — conversations that uniquely address the complex spectrum of care needed for orphans globally. This year’s conference theme is Urgency & Complexity: Biblical & Ethical Approaches to the Orphan Crisis. If you join us, you’ll leave Greenville having thought deeply and biblically about family preservation and reunification, indigenous and international adoption, foster care, and domestic adoption.

This year’s general session topics include:

“The Gospel of Adoption as Family Reunification”

“The Church’s Role in Family Preservation, Reunification, and Adoption”

“Balancing the Scales: Protecting and Defending the Fatherless in Our Own Communities”

“Child Catchers or The Hands and Feet of Jesus? How Everyday Christians Can Engage in the Complex World of Orphan Care”

“Orphan Care & Adoption Together: How Those on Both Sides of the Fence Can and Must Work Together”

“Where Do we Go from Here? The Future of the Church and the Global Orphan Crisis”

Each general session talk is followed by a 20 minute onstage conversation in which leaders within the evangelical orphan care and adoption movement discuss the topic and its implication for orphan care and adoption.

We will announce our speakers soon.

Our Lives Re-Written

by Dan Cruver Published Jan 21, 2014

If you haven’t already, let me encourage you to listen to second sermon (“Our Lives Re-Written”) that Mike Reeves preached at our 2013 national conference at Southern Seminary in Louisville, KY. He does a masterful job of connecting the love of the Father for His Son to the believer’s compassion for orphaned and vulnerable children. Here’s the climax of Mike’s sermon:

This is Jesus of Nazareth’s ministry manifesto… “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed,19 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19).

The Spirit who moves him to cry, ‘Abba,’ doesn’t stop there. Because if the Son himself doesn’t go out in love, he’s not being like his Father. He’s not being the exact likeness of his Father, unless he goes out in love and healing and kindness…But energized, empowered, motivated by the Spirit of love in him, he goes out bringing his own life, liberty, and love. ‘Tis the life of the Son of God. Do you see it? Filled with the love of the Father, he goes out to bring his Father’s blessing. That is the life of the Son of God. That is the life of the sons of God. With hearts filled with the love of the Father, we share the compassion of the Son. That’s why James can write, ‘Religion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world” (James 1:27). The sons of God love to share their Father’s provision and compassion in the world. Filled with it themselves, they find their own joy in being like their Father.

Listen to more audio from the conference.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday today, I’m re-posting the Live in the Story video about how my youngest son applied the meaning of MLK’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech to a situation he faced at school.

NatCon 2014 Graphic

Urgency & Complexity: Biblical & Ethical Approaches to the Orphan Crisis

Join us October 17-18 in Greenville, South Carolina for Together for Adoption 2014.

Our primary objective for this year’s gathering is to maximize our time together by providing important conversations with people who are key leaders, thinkers, and practitioners in the global orphan movement. We want to facilitate extended conversations that matter — conversations that uniquely address the complex spectrum of care needed for orphans globally. This year’s conference theme is Urgency & Complexity: Biblical & Ethical Approaches to the Orphan Crisis. If you join us, you’ll leave Greenville having thought deeply and biblically about family preservation and reunification, indigenous and international adoption, foster care, and domestic adoption.

This year’s general session topics include:

“The Gospel of Adoption as Family Reunification” (Dan Cruver)

“The Church’s Role in Family Preservation, Reunification, and Adoption” (Jedd Medefind)

“Balancing the Scales: Protecting and Defending the Fatherless in Our Own Communities” (John Sowers)

“Child Catchers or The Hands and Feet of Jesus? How Everyday Christians Can Engage in the Complex World of Orphan Care” (Brandon Hatmaker)

“Orphan Care & Adoption Together: How Those on Both Sides of the Fence Can and Must Work Together”

“Where Do we Go from Here? The Future of the Church and the Global Orphan Crisis” (Jason Kovacs)

Each general session talk is followed by a 20 minute onstage conversation in which leaders within the evangelical orphan care and adoption movement discuss the topic and its implication for orphan care and adoption.

We will announce our speakers soon.
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In case you’re wondering what Greenville (South Carolina) is like, get a “fly-by” look by watching this brief video.

Your browser needs to support frames in order to view this video from GreenvilleHD.com

Wait No More Conference in Tennessee

by Dan Cruver Published Jan 7, 2014

Wait No More Conference TN

Wait No More Conference is coming to Tennessee February 22. We’re praying God places Tennessee’s 264 waiting children into forever families.

Check out their Facebook page for updates as the conference approaches. Pray about asking your church to support this important event. The Gospel is the answer to the orphan crisis and the church is the people through whom the answer is applied.

Free Conference Audio Downloads

by Dan Cruver Published Jan 2, 2014

Download the audio of all the general session talks from our October 4-5 national conference at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY. The audio from our breakout sessions will be available next week. To learn more about our October 4-5 national conference, take a look at the conference booklet (PDF).

Conference Theme: The Story that Changes Everything

What is Together for Adoption about? – 22 minutes (Dan Cruver)

General Session One:

Caring for Orphans in Truth – 16 minutes (Dr. Jon Bergeron, Hope for Orphans)

The Story Gone Wrong - 51 minutes (Mike Reeves)

General Session Two: Stories of the Fatherless - 46 minutes (Dr. Sharen Ford)

General Session Three: The Story Re-Written - 46 minutes (Jason Kovacs)

General Session Four

Encouragement for Adoptive Families - 25 minutes (Dr. Susan Hillis and her son, Alex):

Our Lives Re-Written - 53 minutes (Mike Reeves):

General Session Five: Stories of the Fatherless Re-Written - 42  minutes (Vermon Pierre)

General Session Six: When Everything Sad Comes Untrue - 42 minutes (Scotty Smith)

Conference Trailer:

Conference Highlights:

A repost in memory of Patrick McGoldrick, who died a year ago today.

Patrick McGoldrick died at at 10:05 PM the day after Christmas. I attended college with Patrick and and his wonderful wife, Dena. Patrick was a soccer player, I played basketball, and Dena cheered for both of our teams.

During our respective off seasons, Patrick and I would play pickup basketball together. I loved playing basketball with Patrick, mainly because he competed like he lived: with contagious joy. I don’t have a single memory of Patrick where he didn’t have a smile on his face. That’s not to say that he was never upset or discouraged. It is to say, though, that his life was characterized by joy.

Patrick was diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) a little over a year ago. As soon as I received word about his diagnosis, I began to follow his blog, Patrick’s Story. One of the unspoken questions in my mind as I read his posts was: “What does a horrific disease like ALS do to a Christian’s joy?” Can the joy that our Triune God provides us withstand the unforgiving and unrelenting assault of ALS?

Sometimes we Christians act as if we shouldn’t grieve over loss as deeply as non-Christians do, as if the loss of our health or a loved one shouldn’t bother us as much as it bothers those who don’t know Jesus. “After all,” we sometimes say, “Christians do not grieve as those who are without hope.

But I believe that Christians should actually grieve more deeply over the loss of God’s good gifts to us (life, health, family, friends, etc) than non-Christians do. Just look at how Jesus conducts himself at the tomb of his dear friend Lazarus. The Apostle John makes it abundantly clear to us that Jesus is very angry, not at the unbelief of Mary and her companions, but at what was the cause of all their grief: the death of Lazarus itself. As Herman Ridderbos writes, “The emotion [that Jesus shows at Lazarus' tomb] is the revulsion of everything that is in him against the power of death.” The one who from all eternity knew the joy and good gifts of the eternal Father infinitely better than them all grieved over the loss of his dear friend more deeply than them all. Jesus’ show of emotion at Lazarus’ tomb teaches us that true joy and profound grief are not mutually exclusive; rather, the greater our enjoyment of the joy and good gifts of the Father, the deeper our grief will be over the loss of those good gifts.

As I read Patrick’s blog over the last year, I was immensely encouraged by the fact that Patrick did not sugarcoat what he was struggling with both physically and spiritually. He struggled as one who loved God’s good gift of life and lamented its loss (see hereherehere and here). The way Patrick suffered (and the way his wife Dena and two children suffered) testified to the fact that the Gospel frees us to weep in hope, to rejoice in weeping, and to praise the God/man who will one day make all things new, even though our bodies are now in bondage to decay (Romans 8:21, 23). It was the Gospel that enabled Patrick both to grieve his loss and to say in the final weeks of his life, “My short life in Christ is infinitely greater than a long life without Christ…”

Patrick was able to grieve the way he did because of the one who not only grieved for us but also with us. About Jesus’ grief over the death of Lazarus, Herman Ridderbos beautifully writes:

“Jesus’ deep inner agitation is not limited to what, in his confrontation with death, applies to himself, but also expresses itself in his solidarity with the grief of those who once more go to the tomb to weep over the loss of their dear brother and friend. He weeps with those who are weeping. When ‘the Jews’ see him as a member of the procession, weeping as he goes, they do not misunderstand him when they say, ‘See how he loved him!’ Jesus allows himself to be caught up in the general grief over Lazarus’s death, and there he experiences and participates in the grief of all whose loved ones have gone to the grave. That does not militate against the purpose of his coming to Bethany. As the Son of God he does not come to redeem the world from imaginary grief or to make grief over death imaginary. Therefore he joins the mourning procession for the friend whom he is to raise from the dead, and he weeps . . . Nowhere else in the Gospel does the true nature of the entry of God’s glory into flesh, of God’s identification with the true man Jesus of Nazareth, come more vividly to expression than in Jesus’ going—described thus—to the tomb of Lazarus” (emphasize mine).

It is a great honor for me to have known Patrick and Dena. In his life and in his death, Patrick reminded me afresh that the Gospel is indeed for real life. Because of the Gospel, not even ALS can steal a Christian’s joy.

On October 12, 2012, Patrick McGoldrick received the Outstanding Faithful Service Award by Baptist Bible College & Seminary — the school from which both Patrick and I graduated. Patrick was interviewed by the school, and the video below was prepared by them and shown to the crowd at the service. Patrick’s best friend, Matt Frey, spoke for him. Also, take a few minutes to read the moving reflection that Matt Frey wrote about Patrick.

The Advent of Adoption

by Dan Cruver Published Dec 23, 2013

*Guest Blog by Jennifer Strange . See bio below.

“Therefore the Lord waits to be gracious to you,
and therefore he exalts himself to show mercy to you.
For the Lord is a God of justice;
blessed are all those who wait for him.”

– Isaiah 30:18

It’s Advent again. This season of coming toward. This season when we remember that God came toward us, that Jesus made his home among us. This season when we remember that God will come toward us again, that Jesus will make a forever home for his brothers and sisters.

King - Justin Gerard

So we are always in Advent. Always toward the coming of the future King, the forever home, the finished adoption. Come, Lord Jesus. Come, Brother. We don’t want to wait any longer for the coming. Come already.

As this particular Advent season comes to a close, my husband and I approach the long-awaited finale of our third son’s adoption. Of course, he’s ours already in so many ways, having been in our care since the moment of his birth. We hesitate in no way to call him our son. But in the eyes of the law, we are merely his legal guardians, patiently anticipating the “gotcha day” when a court will declare him a Strange (poor thing) and therefore our legitimate heir just like his brothers are already by virtue of their birth.

By one calendar, we’ve been waiting for this court date for almost ten years, wanting to adopt since early in our marriage. By another calendar, we have only been waiting three years, since we didn’t start taking practical steps toward adoption until fall 2010. Of course, our first practical step was attending a conference (because we’re that kind of people), and we took many other essential practical steps after that. We could measure the wait so many different ways: nine months from start to finish of the home study, eight months from completed home study to match, one month from match to birth, three days from birth to surrender, six months and counting from surrender to finalization. But no matter where you start, there is always the waiting.

During the last six months before our match, we learned about maybe 100 different domestic adoption situations: babies due soon or children already born and needing forever families. I began making a list of those we contemplated for more than a few moments—names of people for whom we prayed specifically. The list numbers 30, each line naming a birth mother, and sometimes a birth father, and sometimes a child already in the breathing world. More than thirty real people associated with countless other real people. All in a fiery waiting room. All hoping to survive the waiting, if only as slick coals. And that’s just the one room of people we could see in a world with tens of thousand of rooms in millions of houses.

I don’t want to wait anymore. Almost 18 million children in the world have no living parent and lack appropriate care. More than 400,000 American children are in foster care right now, and nearly 60 thousand of them live in institutions or group homes rather than with families. Half that many will age out of the system without forever families, and just as many newborns are placed for adoption privately or through agencies every year in the United States. The numbers are fatiguing.

So let’s go. Let’s move. Why does the Lord wait to come and show mercy? Why doesn’t he just do it already? Isaiah 30 tells us that the Lord is a God of justice, but there is something about justice that requires waiting. Ah, Advent. We wait because he will come: he will exalt himself to show mercy. In the meantime, we groan.

Adoption journeys almost always seem longer than they should be because by the time you actually embark on one, you’re beyond ready to finish. There are papers to file, questions to answer, fingerprints to submit. And several pausing places with nothing to do but wait: you can’t make the days pass faster, and you can’t force the match. Starting only gains you the right to wait for the finish. You must wait with eager longing. “In order to arrive at what you are not / You must go through the way in which you are not,” Eliot wrote. So you groan.

We live in a broken world, and the brokenness itself calls us to action. Those who wait on God dare not turn away from the distress but must walk into the messy middle of it. Because only the adopted sons and daughters of God dare do such waiting.

The word adoption indicates movement toward choice or desire. Adoptive parents declare “mine” over a child that isn’t theirs naturally but whom they have chosen to parent, and then they look forward to how that “mine” will play out over time. That can be exciting, but it can only happen in a broken world. It’s ashes that God makes beauty out of.

Indeed, God makes that same kind of risky movement by choice when he adopts sons and daughters for himself. He makes many who do not rightly belong in his family into his legitimate children through the agency of their elder brother Jesus. He chose to love many from before the foundations of the world, and he loves them to the end with a perfect Father’s love (see Ephesians 1:3–5). That talk in the Bible about being God’s “children” is no cute metaphor: it’s an eternal reality with immediate and long-term implications.

The season of Advent confirms that for us: “When the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons” (Galatians 4:4–5). Every year during the month before Christmas, we remember that the Messiah came—incarnate, God with us, “born that man no more may die; born to raise the sons of earth.” Also in the month before Christmas, we celebrate the truth that the Messiah will come again; he has not left his brothers and sisters forever but only for a time during which he is homemaking for us (John 14:3). He will bring many sons and daughters to glory (Hebrews 2:10).

But when? Sometimes I wish I knew. The world is sick and our hearts with it. We have evidence that our God is on the move: the “Abba!” cry within us, confirming our adoption (Romans 8:14; Galatians 4:6) and kindling our desire to see him face to face. But when will he appear? The Spirit reminds us to wait with patient anticipation—he will come. He will come on “gotcha day.”

Just like our third son is ours in almost every sense, so we who call ourselves the sons and daughters of God are his in almost every sense . . . pending finalization. Romans 8:19–25 tell us that all of creation—the trees, the plants, the birds, the bees—is desperate for our adoption to be complete. The creation is in labor, but not the sort that ends in childbirth; rather, the creation labors toward the cosmic gotcha day. We were saved in the hope that it is coming, but we must patiently anticipate it. No woman labors forever—her rest comes eventually. So too we children will come to rest. So too all of creation. We will have our cosmic gotcha day. We will one day come to our Father’s home, and we will abide there as his forever.

On that day, the sons and daughters of God will be revealed finally and fully as his legitimate heirs. We will have the redemption of our bodies, and all of creation will see glory. No more sin, no more sadness. No more orphans or group homes or trafficking or abuse. No more brokenness of any sort. Just glory. No wonder the nonrational creation finds a voice: the resurrection of the adopted will be a sight worth seeing. No wonder the hope of the glory to be revealed on that cosmic gotcha day makes the creation and we with it groan. As John writes, “Beloved, we are God’s children now, and what we will be has not yet appeared; but we know that when he appears we shall be like him, because we shall see [our Father] as he is” (1 John 3:2).

So we are in the Advent of our Adoption. Blessed are those who wait for him.
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Jennifer Strange a wife and mother of three sons—two by birth, one by adoption. Also a writer, editor, Twitterer. Her poems and essays have appeared in Rock and Sling, The Other Journal, The Southern Poetry Anthology, and the Art House America blog, which she also serves as assistant editor.

Conclusion to the Survey of the Ante-Nicene Fathers

Our search of the Hendrickson edition of the Ante-Nicene Fathers (vols.1-10) is now complete.  The last documents ~ newly discovered or translated in the late nineteenth century ~ provide no mention of the doctrine of adoption. In the main we wouldn’t expect them to. They are works connected with the Gospels (The Gospel of Peter and The Diatessaron of Tatian [a harmony of the four gospels]); various apocalypses and romances;  the Epistles of Clement The Apology of Aristides the Philosopher*; and The Passion of the Scillitan Martyrs. See A-N F 9:1-285.

Accordingly, we’re now ready to summarize briefly the main lessons learned from the theological history of adoption up to A.D. 325. Eight observations come to mind:

1.  There is no written piece dedicated exclusively to the doctrine of adoption or its spiritual or practical application. Neither is there a distinct section on adoption in any of the earliest writings. Evidently, adoption was not a theme considered in its own right, but then few theological themes were.

2. References to adoption are sporadic and typically appear without forewarning. They are sufficiently numerous to teach us not to rely on the contents pages and indices for guidance as to the profile of the doctrine in the first three centuries.

3. The consistent omission of adoption from the indices is more a standing tribute to the later neglect of adoption. Whereas the doctrine appears in a surprising number of contexts in the fathers’ writings (albeit in an undeveloped way), the uniform omission of adoption from the indices bespeaks its loss from the overall theological consciousness of the church in subsequent centuries. This loss began without announcement amid the defense of the faith from external pressures and internal disputes over the Trinity and the person of Christ. We now know, for example, that mention of adoption petered out among both the Greek and Latin fathers in the run up to the Council of Nicea.

4. The writings of the ante-Nicene period reveal how seismic has been the influence of the Reformation for the discussion of the doctrine of salvation. On the one hand, the fathers’ focus on justification is not what it became a millennium later; on the other hand, justification does not overshadow adoption in the early centuries as it began to in Reformation and post-Reformation times. It seems to me, that the explicit ante-Nicene references to justification and adoption are comparable in number and weight, yet each receives less attention than regeneration (the new birth).

5.   The main go-to theologians of the period for interest in the doctrine of adoption are Irenaeus and Clement of Alexandria among the Greek Fathers, and Tertullian and Hippolytus among their Latin counterparts**. This fact helps guide further research into the Fathers, but also aids the quest to discover the origin of Calvin’s interest in adoption.

6. The survey confirms that the Puritan focus on adoption in the order or application of salvation must be evened out with due attention to the unfolding of adoption in the history of salvation. This is not to say that the narrower experiential focus of the Puritans should be replaced with the broad historical focus of, for example, Irenaeus or Clement, but it is to say that the biblical data supports biblical- and systematic-theological considerations. Where these are combined we can anticipate a fuller and richer understanding of adoption ~ one cognizant of its place and profile in both the history and application of salvation.

7. The fathers’ appreciation of Paul’s redemptive-historical unfolding of adoption went some way to curtail the now ingrained practice of mixing the respective adoption and new birth models of Paul and John. That said, their comparative inattention to the correlation of the various elements of the application of salvation kept them from escaping entirely the admixture. It was likely born of their underplaying of the humanness of Scripture (e.g., the authorial distinction between John and Paul), the distinctive structures of biblical models (the new birth and adoption), and of the specifics of the biblical data in view. Any fresh construction of the doctrine of adoption needs to take account of these factors.

8. There’s a passing suggestion in the ante-Nicene fathers of the realization of the application of theological or spiritual adoption to orphan care and diaconal adoption. It’s not much, but it is there to a degree sufficient to encourage those advancing adoption ministries today.

Separated as we are from these earliest fathers by distance and time, their words remind us above all that we belong as the sons and daughters of God to the same household; that we have been brought together through union in Christ’s Sonship; and that we can triumph today as they did in their trials and persecutions. Trust in the same heavenly Father is crucial, as is hope in the same inheritance. This is the grace of adoption to which the theological details point and in which our hearts beat. Thank you, Abba!

 

* The discovery of Aristides’ Apology revised the claim that Justin Martyr is the earliest known post-biblical apologist for the Christian faith.

** Recall that Hippolytus, living in Rome but the last father to write in the Greek of the New Testament, could be listed as either a Greek or Latin father.

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Further access to the ministry of Tim J. R. Trumper is available at:

www.fromhisfullness.com (personal); www.7thref.org (church)

 

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